judicatory

[joo-di-kuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee]
adjective
1.
of or pertaining to judgment or the administration of justice; judiciary: judicatory power.
noun, plural judicatories.
2.
a court of law and justice; tribunal; judiciary.
3.
the administration of justice.

Origin:
1565–75; (noun) < Medieval Latin jūdicātōrium law court, equivalent to jūdicā(re) to judge + -tōrium -tory2; (adj.) < Late Latin jūdicātōrius, equivalent to jūdicā(re) + -tōrius -tory1

nonjudicatory, adjective, noun, plural nonjudicatories.
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World English Dictionary
judicatory (ˈdʒuːdɪkətərɪ)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to the administration of justice
 
n
2.  a court of law
3.  the administration of justice
 
judica'torial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

judicatory
1570s, from L.L. judicatorius "judicial," from L. judicatus, pp. of judicare "to judge;" related to judicem (see judge).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Many have appeared as expert witnesses for ad judicatory proceedings and litigation actions.
Materials that are part of an ad judicatory process.
Commission may enter into an ad judicatory phase of this investigation.
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