judiciarily

judiciary

[joo-dish-ee-er-ee, -dish-uh-ree]
noun, plural judiciaries.
1.
the judicial branch of government.
2.
the system of courts of justice in a country.
3.
judges collectively.
adjective
4.
pertaining to the judicial branch or system or to judges.

Origin:
1580–90; orig. adj. < Latin jūdiciārius of the law courts, equivalent to jūdici(um) judgment (see judge) + -ārius -ary

judiciarily, adverb
subjudiciary, adjective, noun, plural subjudiciaries.

judicial, judiciary, judicious (see synonym study at judicious).
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
judiciary (dʒuːˈdɪʃɪərɪ, -ˈdɪʃərɪ)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to courts of law, judgment, or judges
 
n , -aries
2.  executive Compare legislature the branch of the central authority in a state concerned with the administration of justice
3.  the system of courts in a country
4.  the judges collectively; bench

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

judiciary
1611, from L. judiciarius "of or belonging to a court of justice," from judicium "judgment," from judicem (see judge). The noun meaning "a body of judges, judges collectively" is from 1802.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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