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Judy

[joo-dee] /ˈdʒu di/
noun
1.
the wife of Punch in the puppet show called Punch and Judy.
2.
Also, Judie. a female given name, form of Judith.

Holliday

[hol-i-dey] /ˈhɒl ɪˌdeɪ/
noun
1.
Judith Tuvim ("Judy") 1921–65, U.S. comic actress.

Johnson

[jon-suh n; for 3 also Swedish yoo n-sawn] /ˈdʒɒn sən; for 3 also Swedish ˈyʊn sɔn/
noun
1.
Andrew, 1808–75, seventeenth president of the U.S. 1865–69.
2.
Charles Spurgeon
[spur-juh n] /ˈspɜr dʒən/ (Show IPA),
1893–1956, U.S. educator and sociologist.
3.
Claudia Alta Taylor ("Lady Bird") 1912–2007, U.S. First Lady 1963–69 (wife of Lyndon Johnson).
4.
(Earvin) Magic, Jr, born 1959, U.S. basketball player.
5.
Eyvind
[ey-vin] /ˈeɪ vɪn/ (Show IPA),
1900–76, Swedish writer: Nobel prize 1974.
6.
Gerald White, 1890–1980, U.S. writer.
7.
Howard (Deering)
[deer-ing] /ˈdɪər ɪŋ/ (Show IPA),
1896?–1972, U.S. businessman: founder of restaurant and motel chain.
8.
Jack (John Arthur) 1878–1946, U.S. heavyweight prizefighter: world champion 1908–15.
9.
James Price, 1891–1955, U.S. pianist and jazz composer.
10.
James Weldon
[wel-duh n] /ˈwɛl dən/ (Show IPA),
1871–1938, U.S. poet and essayist.
11.
Lyndon Baines
[lin-duh n beynz] /ˈlɪn dən beɪnz/ (Show IPA),
1908–73, thirty-sixth president of the U.S. 1963–69.
12.
Michael, born 1967, U.S. track athlete.
13.
Philip C(ortelyou) 1906–2005, U.S. architect and author.
14.
Reverdy
[rev-er-dee] /ˈrɛv ər di/ (Show IPA),
1796–1876, U.S. lawyer and politician: senator 1845–49, 1863–68.
15.
Richard Mentor
[men-ter,, -tawr] /ˈmɛn tər,, -tɔr/ (Show IPA),
1780–1850, vice president of the U.S. 1837–41.
16.
Robert, 1911–38, U.S. blues singer and guitarist from the Mississippi Delta.
17.
Samuel ("Dr. Johnson") 1709–84, English lexicographer, critic, poet, and conversationalist.
18.
Thomas, 1732–1819, U.S. politician and Supreme Court justice 1791–93.
19.
Virginia E(shelman)
[esh-uh l-muh n] /ˈɛʃ əl mən/ (Show IPA),
born 1925, U.S. psychologist: researcher on human sexual behavior (wife of William H. Masters).
20.
Walter Perry ("Big Train") 1887–1946, U.S. baseball player.
21.
Sir William, 1715–74, British colonial administrator in America, born in Ireland.
22.
William Julius ("Judy") 1899–1989, U.S. baseball player, Negro Leagues star.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for Judy

Judy

/ˈdʒuːdɪ/
noun (pl) -dies
1.
the wife of Punch in the children's puppet show Punch and Judy See Punch
2.
(often not capital) (Brit, slang) a girl or woman
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Judy

pet form of Judith. Figurative uses often are from the Punch and Judy puppet show.

johnson

n.

"penis," 1863, perhaps related to British slang John Thomas, which has the same meaning (1887).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for Judy

judy

noun
  1. A sexually promiscuous girl or woman (1823+)
  2. A girl or woman (1885+)

Judy

sentence

I have you in sight or on the radar screen

[WWII Air Forces; origin unknown]


johnson

noun

The penis: beat out time with their titties and their johnsons/ I've only got one Johnson, and he winks/ Enough is enough, turn my jones loose

Related Terms

john

[1863+; origin unknown; such a use is recorded fr Canada in the mid-1800s, perhaps as a euphemism for the British euphemism John Thomas, ''penis'']


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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