juncture

[juhngk-cher]
noun
1.
a point of time, especially one made critical or important by a concurrence of circumstances: At this juncture, we must decide whether to stay or to walk out.
2.
a serious state of affairs; crisis: The matter has reached a juncture and a decision must be made.
3.
the line or point at which two bodies are joined; joint or articulation; seam.
4.
the act of joining.
5.
the state of being joined.
6.
something by which two things are joined.
7.
Phonetics.
a.
a pause or other phonological feature or modification of a feature, as the lengthening of a preceding phoneme or the strengthening of a following one, marking a transition or break between sounds, especially marking the phonological boundary of a word, clause, or sentence: it is present in such words as night-rate and re-seed and absent in such words as nitrate and recede. Compare close juncture, open juncture, terminal juncture.
b.
the point in a word or group of words at which such a pause or other junctural marker occurs.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin junctūra, equivalent to junct(us) (see junction) + -ūra -ure

junction, juncture (see synonym study at junction).


1, 3. See junction.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
juncture (ˈdʒʌŋktʃə)
 
n
1.  a point in time, esp a critical one (often in the phrase at this juncture)
2.  linguistics
 a.  a pause in speech or a feature of pronunciation that introduces, accompanies, or replaces a pause
 b.  the set of phonological features signalling a division between words, such as those that distinguish a name from an aim
3.  a less common word for junction

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

juncture
1382, "place where two things are joined," from L. junctura "a joining, uniting, a joint," from junctus, pp. of jungere "to join" (see jugular). Sense of "point in time" first recorded 1656, probably from astrology.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

juncture junc·ture (jŭngk'chər)
n.
The point, line, or surface of union of two parts.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

juncture

see at this point (juncture).

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
The narrow, winding brick path allows one to wander around two ponds and over
  an arched stone bridge at the point of juncture.
What term describes/identifies the juncture between theory and practice?
At this critical juncture I'd like to offer some relationship counseling.
At the most critical juncture in my career, I decided upon part-time work.
Idioms & Phrases
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