jussive

[juhs-iv] Grammar.
adjective
1.
(especially in Semitic languages) expressing a mild command.
noun
2.
a jussive form, mood, case, construction, or word.

Origin:
1840–50; < Latin juss(us) (past participle of jubēre to command) + -ive

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jussive (ˈdʒʌsɪv)
 
adj
grammar another word for imperative
 
[C19: from Latin jūssus ordered, from jubēre to command]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

jussive
"grammatical mode expressing command," 1846, from L. jussus, pp. of jubere "to bid, command."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for jussive
The other moods are the infinitive, conditional, and jussive.
The imperative has the endings of the jussive but lacks any prefixes.
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