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juxtapose

[juhk-stuh-pohz, juhk-stuh-pohz] /ˈdʒʌk stəˌpoʊz, ˌdʒʌk stəˈpoʊz/
verb (used with object), juxtaposed, juxtaposing.
1.
to place close together or side by side, especially for comparison or contrast.
Origin
1850-1855
1850-55; back formation from juxtaposition
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for juxtaposed
  • juxtaposed to them is a farcical affair about a practical joker in a high-rise.
  • Starting with a six-metre high, primary rectangle, he imposed a minute linear variation on each fresh juxtaposed layer.
  • The number, juxtaposed next to the recycle symbol, gives you pause.
  • The traditional baroque style juxtaposed with the modern toys creates an inherit interest in the story of the figure.
  • We described the juxtaposed rock types to him and the nature of the contact across the landscape.
  • My only quarrel was that the two articles were not juxtaposed.
  • At the level of a company, profits and rights are quite juxtaposed.
  • The is an underlying romanticism juxtaposed with unpolished sophistication that cannot be replicated even if one tried.
  • They said the sponsors cited fears that their commercials might be juxtaposed with such images as dead or maimed soldiers.
  • Its a free and networked world, you don't need to be juxtaposed to have relations with a country or its people.
British Dictionary definitions for juxtaposed

juxtapose

/ˌdʒʌkstəˈpəʊz/
verb
1.
(transitive) to place close together or side by side
Derived Forms
juxtaposition, noun
juxtapositional, adjective
Word Origin
C19: back formation from juxtaposition, from Latin juxta next to + position
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for juxtaposed

juxtapose

v.

1851, from French juxtaposer (1835), from Latin iuxta (see juxtaposition) + French poser (see pose (v.1)). Related: Juxtaposed; juxtaposing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Difficulty index for juxtapose

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Word Value for juxtaposed

27
31
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