kaishu

k'ai shu

[kahy shoo]
noun
a variety of Chinese script developed in the 4th century a.d. and considered standard since that time.
Also, Pinyin, kaishu.


Origin:
< Chinese kǎishū formal (i.e., square-style, printed-style) writing

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kaishu

in Chinese calligraphy, a stylization of chancery script developed during the period of the Three Kingdoms and Western Jin (220-316/317) that simplified the lishu script into a more fluent and easily written form. Characterized by clear-cut corners and straight strokes of varying thickness, the kaishu script underwent its most vital period of development and was the most important type of script during the Tang dynasty (618-907), when a successful career in the civil service depended in part on one's skill as a calligrapher. It remains the standard script in use today and the model for public function and printed type.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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