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kaleidoscope

[kuh-lahy-duh-skohp] /kəˈlaɪ dəˌskoʊp/
noun
1.
an optical instrument in which bits of glass, held loosely at the end of a rotating tube, are shown in continually changing symmetrical forms by reflection in two or more mirrors set at angles to each other.
2.
a continually changing pattern of shapes and colors.
3.
a continually shifting pattern, scene, or the like:
The 1920s were a kaleidoscope of fads and fashions.
Origin
1817
1817; < Greek kal(ós) beautiful + eîdo(s) shape + -scope
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for kaleidoscope
  • Experience became a kaleidoscope rather than a straight line.
  • The plume of smoke left behind by the shuttle as it rose into the sky was an unusual kaleidoscope of color.
  • Ocean currents govern the world's weather and churn a kaleidoscope of life.
  • The kaleidoscope of color continues on the upstairs level.
  • Fall is fast approaching, and with it comes the opportunity to take in nature's kaleidoscope of colors.
  • Suddenly, as if by magic, the entire social kaleidoscope has been changed.
  • The swift, magic kaleidoscope of dawn hardens into the stark colors of day.
  • They were accompanied by a kaleidoscope of tropical juices.
  • As the mechanism spins, these dots dance before viewers' eyes and the effect is close to that of a kaleidoscope.
  • Exhibits include an interactive sound sculpture, walk-in kaleidoscope, dinosaur fossil dig and model lobster boat.
British Dictionary definitions for kaleidoscope

kaleidoscope

/kəˈlaɪdəˌskəʊp/
noun
1.
an optical toy for producing symmetrical patterns by multiple reflections in inclined mirrors enclosed in a tube. Loose pieces of coloured glass, paper, etc, are placed between transparent plates at the far end of the tube, which is rotated to change the pattern
2.
any complex pattern of frequently changing shapes and colours
3.
a complicated set of circumstances
Derived Forms
kaleidoscopic (kəˌlaɪdəˈskɒpɪk) adjective
kaleidoscopically, adverb
Word Origin
C19: from Greek kalos beautiful + eidos form + -scope
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for kaleidoscope
n.

1817, literally "observer of beautiful forms," coined by its inventor, Scottish scientist David Brewster (1781-1868), from Greek kalos "beautiful" + eidos "shape" (see -oid) + -scope, on model of telescope, etc. They sold by the thousands in the few years after their invention, but Brewster failed to secure a patent.

Figurative meaning "constantly changing pattern" is first attested 1819 in Lord Byron, whose publisher had sent him one. As a verb, from 1891. A kaleidophone (1827) was invented by English physicist Sir Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) to make sound waves visible.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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kaleidoscope in Technology
language
An object-oriented language which mixes imperative programming and constraint-oriented features. Kaleidoscope was written by Freeman-Benson of the University of Washington, Universite de Nantes, 1989; University of Victoria, 1992. It is similar to Siri and vaguely related to Prose.
Versions: Kaleidoscope '90 and Kaleidoscope '91.
["Kaleidoscope: Mixing Objects, Constraints and Imperative Programming", B.N. Freeman-Benson, SIGPLAN Notices 25(10):77-88 (OOPSLA/ECOOP '90) (Oct 1990)].
["Constraint Imperative Programming", B.N. Freeman-Benson, Ph.D. Thesis, TR 91-07-02, U Wash (1991)].
["Constraint Imperative Programming", Freeman-Benson et al, IEEE Conf on Comp Lang, Apr 1992].
(1994-11-09)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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