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kinetic energy

noun, Physics.
1.
the energy of a body or a system with respect to the motion of the body or of the particles in the system.
Compare potential energy.
Origin
1865-1870
1865-70
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for kinetic energy
  • Visually the movie looks flat and has little kinetic energy.
  • The kinetic energy produced is collected by a piston pump.
  • Temperature indicates nothing more than the average movement (kinetic energy) of the water molecules relative to each other.
  • As the particles in the beam are accelerated, their mass increases in proportion to their kinetic energy.
  • If there were no air resistance, he would be going much faster and would have much more kinetic energy.
  • There is insufficient kinetic energy to break down the crystaline structure.
  • Expended kinetic energy hangs in the air like gunsmoke.
  • Much of the radiation released in a nuclear explosion gets degraded by atomic processes to kinetic energy of the air molecules.
  • The kinetic energy of a moving body equals its mass times the square of its velocity.
  • If an object is crashing into a wall, it does not transfer its kinetic energy to the wall.
British Dictionary definitions for kinetic energy

kinetic energy

noun
1.
the energy of motion of a body, equal to the work it would do if it were brought to rest The translational kinetic energy depends on motion through space, and for a rigid body of constant mass is equal to the product of half the mass times the square of the speed. The rotational kinetic energy depends on rotation about an axis, and for a body of constant moment of inertia is equal to the product of half the moment of inertia times the square of the angular velocity. In relativistic physics kinetic energy is equal to the product of the increase of mass caused by motion times the square of the speed of light. The SI unit is the joule but the electronvolt is often used in atomic physics Ek, K, T, KE
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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kinetic energy in Medicine

kinetic energy n.
The energy possessed by a body because of its motion, equal to one half the mass of the body times the square of its speed.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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kinetic energy in Science
kinetic energy
  (kə-nět'ĭk)   
The energy possessed by a system or object as a result of its motion. The kinetic energy of objects with mass is dependent upon the velocity and mass of the object, while the energy of waves depends on their velocity, frequency, and amplitude, as well as the density of the medium if there is one (as with ocean waves). Compare potential energy.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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kinetic energy in Culture
kinetic energy [(ki-net-ik)]

The energy an object has because of its motion.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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13
15
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