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Denotation vs. Connotation

kit-kat

[kit-kat] /ˈkɪtˌkæt/
noun
1.

kit-cat

or kit-kat

[kit-kat] /ˈkɪtˌkæt/
noun
1.
any of a series of half-length portraits of members of the Kit-Cat Club that were painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller between 1702 and 1717, measure almost uniformly 28 × 36 inches (71 × 91 cm), characteristically portray the head, upper torso, and hands, and are now in the National Gallery, London.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for kit-kat
Historical Examples
  • Gore also sold crayons in sets and canvas for portrait painting in half-length cloths, kit-kat and three-quarters length.

  • The origin and early history of the kit-kat Club is obscure.

  • He himself had tried to be a poet, and in 1703 wrote verses for the toasting-cups of the kit-kat.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • Why did you hang that kit-kat of yourself behind the door, Haward?

    Audrey Mary Johnston
  • This he did in 1719, and the poor and the kit-kat must both have felt his loss.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • Addison must have been past forty when he became a member of the kit-kat.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • A place among the exclusives of the kit-kat was only the just reward of such attainments, and he had it.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • If the conversation of the kit-kat was anything like that in this member's comedies, it must have been highly edifying.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • His was probably the purest character among those of all the members of the kit-kat.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
  • At the kit-kat he once stayed to drink long after he had said that he must be off to see his patients.

    A Book about Doctors John Cordy Jeaffreson
Word Origin and History for kit-kat

kit-cat

club founded by Whig politicians in London, 1703; so called from Christopher ("Kit") Catling, keeper of the tavern on Shire Lane, near Temple Bar, in which the club first met. Meaning "a size of portrait less than half length" (1754), supposedly is because the dining room in which portraits of club members hung was too low for half-length portraits.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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7
7
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