knowing

[noh-ing]
adjective
1.
affecting, implying, or deliberately revealing shrewd knowledge of secret or private information: a knowing glance.
2.
that knows; having knowledge or information; intelligent.
3.
shrewd, sharp, or astute.
4.
conscious; intentional; deliberate.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English knawynge (earlier knowende, knawande). See know1, -ing2

knowingly, adverb
knowingness, noun


1. meaningful, significant, eloquent, perceptive.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
knowing (ˈnəʊɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  suggesting secret information or knowledge
2.  wise, shrewd, or clever
3.  deliberate; intentional
 
n
4.  there is no knowing one cannot tell
 
'knowingly
 
adv
 
'knowingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

know
O.E. cnawan (class VII strong verb; past tense cneow, pp. cnawen), from P.Gmc. *knoeanan (cf. O.H.G. bi-chnaan, ir-chnaan "to know"), from PIE base *gno- "to know" (cf. O.Pers. xnasatiy "he shall know;" O.C.S. znati, Rus. znat "to know;" L. gnoscere; Gk. *gno-, as in gignoskein; Skt. jna- "know"). Once
widespread in Gmc., this form is now retained only in Eng., where however it has widespread application, covering meanings that require two or more verbs in other languages (e.g. Ger. wissen, kennen, erkennen and in part können; Fr. connaître, savoir; L. novisse, cognoscire, scire; O.C.S. znaja, vemi). The Anglo-Saxons used two distinct words for this, witan (see wit) and cnawan. Meaning "to have sexual intercourse with" is attested from c.1200, from the O.T. To not know one's ass from one's elbow is from 1930. To know better "to have learned from experience" is from 1704. You know as a parenthetical filler is from 1712, but it has roots in 14c. M.E. Know-how "technical expertise" first recorded 1838 in Amer.Eng. Know-nothing "ignoramus" is from 1827; as a U.S. nativist political party, active 1853-56, the name refers to the secret society at the core of the party, about which members were instructed to answer, if asked about it, that they "know nothing." The party merged into the Republican Party.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Each culture in the world has borrowed attributes from other cultures whether
  knowingly or not, willingly or not.
What he knowingly did--and hid for many years--negates all that.
Anyone saying different is ignorant or knowingly spinning.
Parents who knowingly have avoided vaccinations and whose kids carry
  preventable diseases to others should be prosecuted.
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