lackluster

[lak-luhs-ter]
adjective
1.
lacking brilliance or radiance; dull: lackluster eyes.
2.
lacking liveliness, vitality, spirit, or enthusiasm: a lackluster performance.
noun
3.
a lack of brilliance or vitality.
Also, especially British, lacklustre.


Origin:
1590–1600; lack + luster1

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lacklustre or (US) lackluster (ˈlækˌlʌstə)
 
adj
lacking force, brilliance, or vitality
 
lackluster or (US) lackluster
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lackluster
c.1600, first attested in "As You Like It," from lack + luster. Combinations with lack- were frequent in 16c., e.g. lackland (1590s), of a landless man; lack-Latin (1530s), of an ignorant priest.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Unfortunately, these are precisely the strategies that media companies pursued
  aggressively during the past lackluster decade.
One can easily miss a radiant poem amid the many lackluster ones.
In the last couple of debates, particularly, his performance has been
  lackluster.
What's more, with a lackluster stock market, pension funds and rich people had
  to find more promising places to put their dough.
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