lacuna

[luh-kyoo-nuh]
noun, plural lacunae [luh-kyoo-nee] , lacunas.
1.
a gap or missing part, as in a manuscript, series, or logical argument; hiatus.
2.
Anatomy. one of the numerous minute cavities in the substance of bone, supposed to contain nucleate cells.
3.
Botany. an air space in the cellular tissue of plants.

Origin:
1655–65; < Latin lacūna ditch, pit, hole, gap, deficiency, akin to lacus vat, lake1. Cf. lagoon

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World English Dictionary
lacuna (ləˈkjuːnə)
 
n , pl -nae, -nas
1.  a gap or space, esp in a book or manuscript
2.  biology a cavity or depression, such as any of the spaces in the matrix of bone
3.  another name for coffer
 
[C17: from Latin lacūna pool, cavity, from lacus lake]
 
la'cunose
 
adj
 
la'cunal
 
adj
 
la'cunary
 
adj
 
lacunosity
 
n

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lacuna
1660s, "blank or missing portion in a manuscript," from L. lacuna "hole, pit," dim. of lacus "pond, lake" (see lake (1)). The Latin plural is lacunae.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

lacuna la·cu·na (lə-kyōō'nə)
n. pl. la·cu·nas or la·cu·nae (-nē)

  1. An anatomical cavity, space, or depression, especially in a bone.

  2. An empty space or a missing part; a gap; a defect.

  3. An abnormal space between the strata or between the cellular elements of the epidermis.

  4. See corneal space.


la·cu'nal adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Either way, it suggests a profound lacuna in biologists' understanding of the world.
As discussed above, note how the lacuna is subdivided into the hiatus and degradation vacuity.
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