laisserfaire

laissez-faire

[les-ey-fair; French le-sey-fer]
adjective
of, pertaining to, or conforming to the principles or practices of laissez faire.
Also, laisser-faire.


Origin:
1815–25

laissez-faireism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

laissez-faire
1825, also laissez faire, from Fr., lit. "let (people) do (as they think best)," from laissez, imperative of laisser "to let" + faire "to do" (from L. facere; see factitious). From the phrase laissez faire et laissez passer, motto of certain 18c. French economists, chosen
to express the ideal of government non-interference in business and industry.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
laissez-faire [(les-ay-fair, lay-zay-fair)]

French for “Let (people) do (as they choose).” It describes a system or point of view that opposes regulation or interference by the government in economic affairs beyond the minimum necessary to allow the free enterprise system to operate according to its own laws.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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