leopard

[lep-erd]
noun
1.
a large, spotted Asian or African carnivore, Panthera pardus, of the cat family, usually tawny with black markings; the Old World panther: all leopard populations are threatened or endangered.
2.
the fur or pelt of this animal.
3.
any of various related cats resembling this animal.
4.
Heraldry. a lion represented from the side as walking, usually with one forepaw raised, and looking toward the spectator.
5.
Numismatics.
a.
an Anglo-Gallic gold coin issued by Edward III, equal to half a florin, bearing the figure of a leopard.
b.
a silver Anglo-Gallic coin issued by Henry V.
6.
(initial capital letter) Military. a 42-ton (38-metric ton) West German tank with a 105mm gun.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Late Latin leōpardus < Greek leópardos, syncopated variant of leontópardos, equivalent to leonto- (stem of léōn) lion + párdos pard1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To leopards
Collins
World English Dictionary
leopard (ˈlɛpəd)
 
n
1.  Also called: panther a large feline mammal, Panthera pardus, of forests of Africa and Asia, usually having a tawny yellow coat with black rosette-like spots
2.  any of several similar felines, such as the snow leopard and cheetah
3.  clouded leopard a feline, Neofelis nebulosa, of SE Asia and Indonesia with a yellowish-brown coat marked with darker spots and blotches
4.  heraldry a stylized leopard, painted as a lion with the face turned towards the front
5.  the pelt of a leopard
 
[C13: from Old French lepart, from Late Latin leōpardus, from Late Greek leópardos, from leōn lion + pardospard² (the leopard was thought at one time to be the result of cross-breeding)]
 
'leopardess
 
fem n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

leopard
late 13c., from O.Fr. lebard, leupart, from L.L. leopardus, lit. "lion-pard," from Gk. leopardos, from leon "lion" + pardos "male panther," which generally is said to be connected to Skt. prdakuh "panther, tiger." The animal was thought in ancient times to be a hybrid of these two species.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Leopard definition


(Heb. namer, so called because spotted, Cant. 4:8), was that great spotted feline which anciently infested the mountains of Syria, more appropriately called a panther (Felis pardus). Its fierceness (Isa. 11:6), its watching for its prey (Jer. 5:6), its swiftness (Hab. 1:8), and the spots of its skin (Jer. 13:23), are noticed. This word is used symbolically (Dan. 7:6; Rev. 13:2).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Example sentences for leopards
Typical jungle animals, particularly tigers and leopards, are common in burma.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature