lesion

[lee-zhuhn]
noun
1.
an injury; hurt; wound.
2.
Pathology. any localized, abnormal structural change in the body.
3.
Plant Pathology. any localized, defined area of diseased tissue, as a spot, canker, blister, or scab.
verb (used with object)
4.
to cause a lesion or lesions in.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin laesiōn- (stem of laesiō) injury, equivalent to Latin laes(us) (past participle of laedere to harm, equivalent to laed- verb stem + -tus past participle suffix, with -dt- > -s-) + -iōn- -ion

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World English Dictionary
lesion (ˈliːʒən)
 
n
1.  any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease
2.  an injury or wound
 
[C15: via Old French from Late Latin laesiō injury, from Latin laedere to hurt]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lesion
1452, from M.Fr. lesion, from L. læsionem (nom. læsio) "injury," from lædere "to strike, hurt, damage," of unknown origin. Originally with ref. to any sort of hurt, whether physical or not.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

lesion le·sion (lē'zhən)
n.

  1. A wound or an injury.

  2. A localized pathological change in a bodily organ or tissue.

  3. An infected or diseased patch of skin.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
One possibility is that the tau protein causes the lesions in the brain.
Once the paleontologists recognized the jaw lesions, they found them in
  numerous tyrannosaur specimens.
Now it was a derelict, old and crippled, its bulkheads stained with patches of
  rust that could have been lesions.
Previous studies have confirmed the ability of trained dogs to detect
  skin-cancer melanomas by sniffing skin lesions.
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