let her hair down

hair

[hair]
noun
1.
any of the numerous fine, usually cylindrical, keratinous filaments growing from the skin of humans and animals; a pilus.
2.
an aggregate of such filaments, as that covering the human head or forming the coat of most mammals.
3.
a similar fine, filamentous outgrowth from the body of insects, spiders, etc.
4.
Botany. a filamentous outgrowth of the epidermis.
5.
cloth made of hair from animals, as camel and alpaca.
6.
a very small amount, degree, measure, magnitude, etc.; a fraction, as of time or space: He lost the race by a hair.
Idioms
7.
get in someone's hair, Slang. to annoy or bother someone: Their snobbishness gets in my hair.
8.
hair of the dog, Informal. a drink of liquor, supposed to relieve a hangover: Even a hair of the dog didn't help his aching head. Also, hair of the dog that bit one.
9.
let one's hair down, Informal.
a.
to relax; behave informally: He finally let his hair down and actually cracked a joke.
b.
to speak candidly or frankly; remove or reduce restraints: He let his hair down and told them about his anxieties.
10.
make one's hair stand on end, to strike or fill with horror; terrify: The tales of the jungle made our hair stand on end.
11.
split hairs, to make unnecessarily fine or petty distinctions: To argue about whether they arrived at two o'clock or at 2:01 is just splitting hairs.
12.
tear one's hair, to manifest extreme anxiety, grief, or anger: He's tearing his hair over the way he was treated by them. Also, tear one's hair out.
13.
to a hair, perfect to the smallest detail; exactly: The reproduction matched the original to a hair.
14.
without turning a hair, without showing the least excitement or emotion. Also, not turn a hair.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English heer, Old English hǣr (cognate with Dutch, German haar, Old Norse hār), with vowel perhaps from Middle English haire hair shirt < Old French < Old High German hāria (cognate with Middle English here, Old English hǣre, Old Norse hǣra)

hairlike, adjective
dehair, verb (used with object)

hair, hare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
hair (hɛə)
 
n
1.  any of the threadlike pigmented structures that grow from follicles beneath the skin of mammals and consist of layers of dead keratinized cells
2.  a growth of such structures, as on the human head or animal body, which helps prevent heat loss from the body
3.  botany any threadlike outgrowth from the epidermis, such as a root hair
4.  a.  a fabric or material made from the hair of some animals
 b.  (as modifier): a hair carpet; a hair shirt
5.  another word for hair's-breadth : to lose by a hair
6.  informal get in someone's hair to annoy someone persistently
7.  hair of the dog, hair of the dog that bit one an alcoholic drink taken as an antidote to a hangover
8.  informal (Brit) keep your hair on! keep calm
9.  let one's hair down to behave without reserve
10.  not turn a hair to show no surprise, anger, fear, etc
11.  split hairs to make petty and unnecessary distinctions
 
[Old English hær; related to Old Norse hār, Old High German hār hair, Norwegian herren stiff, hard, Lettish sari bristles, Latin crescere to grow]
 
'hairlike
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hair
O.E. hær, from P.Gmc. *khæran (cf. O.S., O.N., O.H.G. har, O.Fris. her, Du., Ger. haar "hair"), from PIE *ker(s)- "to bristle" (cf. Lith. serys "bristle"). Modern spelling infl. by O.E. haire "haircloth," from O.Fr. haire, from Frank. *harja. Hairy in slang sense of "difficult" is first recorded
1848. Hairbreadth (1561) is said to have been formerly a formal unit of measure equal to one-forty-eighth of an inch. Hairdresser is first recorded 1771; hairdo is 1932, from do (v.). A hairpin turn, etc., is from 1906. A hair-trigger (1830) was originally a secondary trigger in a firearm which sprung free a mechanism (hair) which, when set, allowed the main trigger to be released by very slight force. Hair-raising "exciting" is first attested 1897. To let one's hair down "become familiar" is first recorded 1850. To split hairs "make over-fine distinctions" is first recorded 1652, as to cut the hair. Phrase hair of the dog that bit you (1546), homeopathic remedy, is in Pliny.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

hair (hâr)
n.

  1. Any of the cylindrical, keratinized, often pigmented filaments characteristically growing from the epidermis of a mammal.

  2. A growth of such filaments, as that forming the coat of an animal or covering the scalp of a human.

  3. One of the fine hairlike processes of a sensory cell.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
hair   (hâr)  Pronunciation Key 


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  1. One of the fine strands that grow from the skin of mammals, usually providing insulation against the cold. Modified hairs sometimes serve as protective defenses, as in the quills of a porcupine or hedgehog, or as tactile organs, as in the whiskers (called vibrissae) of many nocturnal mammals. Hair filaments are a modification of the epidermis of the skin and are composed primarily of keratin. Hair also contains melanin, which determines hair color.

  2. A slender growth resembling a mammalian hair, found on insects and other animals.

  3. A fine, threadlike growth from the epidermis of plants. See more at trichome.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Hair definition


(1.) The Egyptians let the hair of their head and beard grow only when they were in mourning, shaving it off at other times. "So particular were they on this point that to have neglected it was a subject of reproach and ridicule; and whenever they intended to convey the idea of a man of low condition, or a slovenly person, the artists represented him with a beard." Joseph shaved himself before going in to Pharoah (Gen. 41:14). The women of Egypt wore their hair long and plaited. Wigs were worn by priests and laymen to cover the shaven skull, and false beards were common. The great masses of hair seen in the portraits and statues of kings and priests are thus altogether artificial. (2.) A precisely opposite practice, as regards men, prevailed among the Assyrians. In Assyrian sculptures the hair always appears long, and combed closely down upon the head. The beard also was allowed to grow to its full length. (3.) Among the Greeks the custom in this respect varied at different times, as it did also among the Romans. In the time of the apostle, among the Greeks the men wore short hair, while that of the women was long (1 Cor. 11:14, 15). Paul reproves the Corinthians for falling in with a style of manners which so far confounded the distinction of the sexes and was hurtful to good morals. (See, however, 1 Tim. 2:9, and 1 Pet. 3:3, as regards women.) (4.) Among the Hebrews the natural distinction between the sexes was preserved by the women wearing long hair (Luke 7:38; John 11:2; 1 Cor. 11:6), while the men preserved theirs as a rule at a moderate length by frequent clipping. Baldness disqualified any one for the priest's office (Lev. 21). Elijah is called a "hairy man" (2 Kings 1:8) from his flowing locks, or more probably from the shaggy cloak of hair which he wore. His raiment was of camel's hair. Long hair is especially noticed in the description of Absalom's person (2 Sam. 14:26); but the wearing of long hair was unusual, and was only practised as an act of religious observance by Nazarites (Num. 6:5; Judg. 13:5) and others in token of special mercies (Acts 18:18). In times of affliction the hair was cut off (Isa. 3:17, 24; 15:2; 22:12; Jer. 7:29; Amos 8:10). Tearing the hair and letting it go dishevelled were also tokens of grief (Ezra 9:3). "Cutting off the hair" is a figure of the entire destruction of a people (Isa. 7:20). The Hebrews anointed the hair profusely with fragrant ointments (Ruth 3:3; 2 Sam. 14:2; Ps. 23:5; 45:7, etc.), especially in seasons of rejoicing (Matt. 6:17; Luke 7:46).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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