licenced

Collins
World English Dictionary
licence or (US) license (ˈlaɪsəns)
 
n
1.  a certificate, tag, document, etc, giving official permission to do something
2.  formal permission or exemption
3.  liberty of action or thought; freedom
4.  intentional disregard of or deviation from conventional rules to achieve a certain effect: poetic licence
5.  excessive freedom
6.  licentiousness
 
[C14: via Old French and Medieval Latin licentia permission, from Latin: freedom, from licet it is allowed]
 
license or (US) license
 
n
 
[C14: via Old French and Medieval Latin licentia permission, from Latin: freedom, from licet it is allowed]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

licence
mid-14c., "liberty (to do something), leave," from from Fr. licence, from L. licentia "freedom, liberty, license," from licentem (nom. licens). prp. of licere "to be allowed, be lawful," from PIE base *leik- "to offer, bargain." Meaning "formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something"
(marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning "excessive liberty, disregard of propriety" is from mid-15c. The verb is first attested late 14c. No etymological justification for the spelling with -s-; attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (cf. advise/advice, devise/device) seem to have failed. Related: Licensed; licensing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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