lieu tenant

lieutenant

[loo-ten-uhnt; in British use, except in the navy, lef-ten-uhnt]
noun
2.
U.S. Navy. a commissioned officer ranking between lieutenant junior grade and lieutenant commander.
3.
a person who holds an office, civil or military, in subordination to a superior for whom he or she acts: If he can't attend, he will send his lieutenant.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, noun use of adj. phrase lieu tenant place-holding. See locum tenens, lieu, tenant

underlieutenant, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
lieutenant (lɛfˈtɛnənt, US luːˈtɛnənt)
 
n
1.  a military officer holding commissioned rank immediately junior to a captain
2.  a naval officer holding commissioned rank immediately junior to a lieutenant commander
3.  (US) an officer in a police or fire department ranking immediately junior to a captain
4.  a person who holds an office in subordination to or in place of a superior
 
[C14: from Old French, literally: place-holding]
 
lieu'tenancy
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lieutenant
late 14c., "one who takes the place of another," from O.Fr. lieu tenant "substitute," lit. "placeholder," from lieu "place" + tenant, prp. of tenir "to hold." The notion is of a "substitute" for higher authority. Specific military sense of "officer next in rank to a captain" is from 1570s. Pronunciation
with lef- is common in Britain, and spellings to reflect it date back to 14c., but the origin of it is mysterious.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Lieutenant definition


(only in A.V. Esther 3:12; 8:9; 9:3; Ezra 8:36), a governor or viceroy of a Persian province having both military and civil power. Correctly rendered in the Revised Version "satrap."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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