list system

list system

noun
based on the principle of proportional representation; voters choose between party lists, the number elected from each list being determined by the percentage cast for each list out of the total vote 
WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

list system

a method of voting for several electoral candidates, usually members of the same political party, with one mark of the ballot. It is used to elect the parliaments of many western European countries, including Switzerland, Italy, the Benelux countries, and Germany. Electors vote for one of several lists of candidates, usually prepared by the political parties. Each party is granted seats in proportion to the number of popular votes it receives. There are several rules for computing the number of seats awarded to a party, the best known being the "d'Hondt rule" and the "largest-remainder rule." Seats are usually awarded to candidates in the order in which their names appear on the lists. Although ordinarily the list system forces the voters to cast their votes for parties rather than for individual candidates, a number of variations on the system permit voter preferences for individuals to be taken into account. The Swiss system, one of the most extreme variations, is marked by panachage, the ability of the voter to mix candidates from several party lists if he so desires.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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