locational

location

[loh-key-shuhn]
noun
1.
a place of settlement, activity, or residence: This town is a good location for a young doctor.
2.
a place or situation occupied: a house in a fine location.
3.
a tract of land of designated situation or limits: a mining location.
4.
Movies. a place outside of the studio that is used for filming a movie, scene, etc.
5.
Computers. any position on a register or memory device capable of storing one machine word.
6.
the act of locating; state of being located.
7.
Civil Law. a letting or renting.
Idioms
8.
on location, Movies. engaged in filming at a place away from the studio, especially one that is or is like the setting of the screenplay: on location in Rome.

Origin:
1585–95; < Latin locātiōn- (stem of locātiō) a placing. See locate, -ion

locational, adjective
locationally, adverb
interlocation, noun
nonlocation, noun

local, locale, locality, location.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
location (ləʊˈkeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  a site or position; situation
2.  the act or process of locating or the state of being located
3.  a place outside a studio where filming is done: shot on location
4.  in South Africa
 a.  See also township a Black African or Coloured township, usually located near a small town
 b.  (formerly) an African tribal reserve
5.  computing a position in a memory capable of holding a unit of information, such as a word, and identified by its address
6.  Roman law, Scots law the letting out on hire of a chattel or of personal services
 
[C16: from Latin locātiō, from locāre to place]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

location
"position, place," 1590s, see locate (v.); Hollywood sense of "place outside a film studio where a scene is filmed" is from 1914.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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