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locum tenens

[loh-kuh m tee-nenz, ten-inz] /ˈloʊ kəm ˈti nɛnz, ˈtɛn ɪnz/
noun, plural locum tenentes
[loh-kuh m tuh-nen-teez] /ˈloʊ kəm təˈnɛn tiz/ (Show IPA).
Chiefly British
1.
a temporary substitute, especially for a doctor or member of the clergy.
Also called locum.
Origin of locum tenens
1635-1645
1635-45; < Medieval Latin locum tenēns holding the place
Related forms
locum-tenency
[loh-kuh m-tee-nuh n-see, -ten-uh n-] /ˌloʊ kəmˈti nən si, -ˈtɛn ən-/ (Show IPA),
noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for locum tenens
Historical Examples
  • On one occasion a locum tenens, who officiated for a few weeks, was stone deaf.

    The Parish Clerk (1907) Peter Hampson Ditchfield
  • He obtained a locum tenens, and gave up the time to pilot me round.

    Reminiscences of Queensland William Henry Corfield
  • A locum tenens had previously received two guineas a week, now he received eight, nine, or even twelve.

  • But his locum tenens did not possess a copy and had no right to demand one.

  • Oh no; I could arrange that by having a locum tenens—‘local demon’ as the servant-girl in Punch called him.

    Jack at Sea George Manville Fenn
  • Also, the locum tenens at Fulcombe no doubt runs the parish as well as I could.

    When the World Shook H. Rider Haggard
  • A drowsy negro, his locum tenens, was the only human thing that offered itself to my eyes.

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • I could not spare more than a fortnight from work, leaving Lennard as my locum tenens.

  • In no condition of life would I care to be the locum tenens for another man.

    An Eye for an Eye Anthony Trollope
  • Furthermore, during the vacancy, the aru beting acts as the locum tenens, but only within certain limits.

British Dictionary definitions for locum tenens

locum tenens

/ˈləʊkəm ˈtiːnɛnz/
noun (pl) locum tenentes (təˈnɛntiːz)
1.
(mainly Brit) a person who stands in temporarily for another member of the same profession, esp for a physician, chemist, or clergyman Often shortened to locum
Word Origin
C17: Medieval Latin: (someone) holding the place (of another)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for locum tenens
n.

Medieval Latin, "one who holds the place (of another);" from locum (nominative locus; see locus) + tenens, present participle of tenere (see tenant).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for locum

9
13
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