logical connective

Encyclopedia

logical connective

in logic, a word or group of words that joins two or more propositions together to form a connective proposition. Commonly used connectives include "but," "and," "or," "if . . . then," and "if and only if." The various types of logical connectives include conjunction ("and"), disjunction ("or"), negation ("not"), conditional ("if . . . then"), and biconditional ("if and only if"). In a conjunction, two or more propositions that are stated as true at the same time are joined by the connective "and," as in the statement "Life is short, and art is long." In a sentence such as "If the weather remains mild and there is no frost, then there will be a good harvest," the connective is "If . . . then." The premises and conclusion of a syllogism are also joined by connectives, as in "All men are mortal and no gods are mortal, therefore no men are gods."

Learn more about logical connective with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Explore Dictionary.com
Previous Definition: logical complement
Next Definition: logical consequence
Words Near: logical connective
More from Thesaurus.com
Synonyms and Antonyms for logical connective
More from Reference.com
Search for articles containing logical connective
Dictionary.com Word FAQs

Dictionary.com presents 366 FAQs, incorporating some of the frequently asked questions from the past with newer queries.

Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature