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logy

[loh-gee] /ˈloʊ gi/
adjective, logier, logiest.
1.
lacking physical or mental energy or vitality; sluggish; dull; lethargic.
Origin
1840-1850
1840-50, Americanism; perhaps < Dutch log heavy, cumbersome + -y1
Related forms
logily, adverb
loginess, noun

-logy

1.
a combining form used in the names of sciences or bodies of knowledge:
paleontology; theology.
2.
a termination of nouns referring to writing, discourses, collections, etc.:
trilogy; martyrology.
Origin
Middle English -logie < Latin -logia < Greek. See -logue, -y3
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for logy
  • Or if you remember that logy is an adjective, then logiest can clear your rack.
  • During the first ten or fifteen minutes of our interview he seemed logy and understandably preoccupied.
  • The motor screamed but the logy boat barely inched ahead.
British Dictionary definitions for logy

logy

/ˈləʊɡɪ/
adjective logier, logiest
1.
(mainly US) dull or listless
Derived Forms
loginess, noun
Word Origin
C19: perhaps from Dutch log heavy

-logy

combining form
1.
indicating the science or study of: musicology
2.
indicating writing, discourse, or body of writings: trilogy, phraseology, martyrology
Derived Forms
-logical, -logic, combining_form:in_adjective
-logist, combining_form:in_noun:countable
Word Origin
from Latin -logia, from Greek, from logos word; see logos
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for logy
adj.

"dull and heavy," 1848, American English, perhaps from Dutch log "heavy, dull" + -y (2); cf. Middle Low German luggich "sleepy, sluggish." Or perhaps a variant of loggy.

-logy

word-forming element meaning "a speaking, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, science," from Greek -logia (often via French -logie or Medieval Latin -logia), from root of legein "to speak;" thus, "the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of (a certain subject);" see lecture (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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logy in Medicine

-logy suff.
Science; theory; study: dermatology.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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