long-term

[lawng-turm, long-]
adjective
1.
covering a relatively long period of time: a long-term lease.
2.
maturing over or after a relatively long period of time: a long-term loan; a long-term bond.
3.
(of a capital gain or loss) derived from the sale or exchange of an asset held for more than a specified time, as six months or one year.

Origin:
1905–10

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
long-term
 
adj
1.  lasting, staying, or extending over a long time: long-term prospects
2.  finance maturing after a long period of time: a long-term bond

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Example sentences
Though unlikely to succeed in the short term, the new treatment might be
  valuable in the long term.
Research suggests that rewards may work in the short term but have damaging
  effects in the long term.
There have been some long term studies made of past disasters.
But trading cannot drive prices up in the long term since for every buy, there
  is a sell.
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