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loophole

[loop-hohl] /ˈlupˌhoʊl/
noun
1.
a small or narrow opening, as in a wall, for looking through, for admitting light and air, or, particularly in a fortification, for the discharge of missiles against an enemy outside.
2.
an opening or aperture.
3.
a means of escape or evasion; a means or opportunity of evading a rule, law, etc.:
There are a number of loopholes in the tax laws whereby corporations can save money.
verb (used with object), loopholed, loopholing.
4.
to furnish with loopholes.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; loop2 + hole
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for loop-hole

loophole

/ˈluːpˌhəʊl/
noun
1.
an ambiguity, omission, etc, as in a law, by which one can avoid a penalty or responsibility
2.
a small gap or hole in a wall, esp one in a fortified wall
verb
3.
(transitive) to provide with loopholes
Word Origin
C16: from loop² + hole
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for loop-hole

loophole

n.

also loop-hole, mid-15c., from Middle English loupe "opening in a wall" for shooting through or admitting light (c.1300), perhaps related to Middle Dutch lupen "to watch, peer;" + hole (n.). Figurative sense of "outlet, means of escape" is from 1660s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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