losings

losing

[loo-zing]
adjective
1.
causing or suffering loss.
noun
2.
losings, losses.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English, Old English; see lose, -ing2, -ing1

losingly, adverb
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World English Dictionary
losing (ˈluːzɪŋ)
 
adj
unprofitable; failing: the business was a losing concern

losings (ˈluːzɪŋz)
 
pl n
losses, esp money lost in gambling

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lose
O.E. losian "be lost, perish," from los "destruction, loss," from P.Gmc. *lausa (cf. O.N. los "the breaking up of an army"), from PIE base *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart, untie, separate" (cf. Skt. lunati "cuts, cuts off," lavitram "sickle;" Gk. lyein "to loosen, untie, slacken," lysus "a loosening;"
L. luere "to loose, release, atone for"). Replaced related leosan (a class II strong verb whose pp. loren survives in forlorn and love-lorn), from P.Gmc. *leusanan (cf. O.H.G. virliosan, Ger. verlieren, O.Fris. urliasa, Goth. fraliusan "to lose"). Transitive sense of "to part with accidentally" is from c.1200. Meaning "to be defeated" (in a game, etc.) is from 1530s. To lose (one's) mind "become insane" is attested from c.1500. To lose out "fail" is 1858, Amer.Eng.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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