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love

[luhv] /lʌv/
noun
1.
a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person.
2.
a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection, as for a parent, child, or friend.
3.
sexual passion or desire.
4.
a person toward whom love is felt; beloved person; sweetheart.
5.
(used in direct address as a term of endearment, affection, or the like):
Would you like to see a movie, love?
6.
a love affair; an intensely amorous incident; amour.
7.
sexual intercourse; copulation.
8.
(initial capital letter) a personification of sexual affection, as Eros or Cupid.
9.
affectionate concern for the well-being of others:
the love of one's neighbor.
10.
strong predilection, enthusiasm, or liking for anything:
her love of books.
11.
the object or thing so liked:
The theater was her great love.
12.
the benevolent affection of God for His creatures, or the reverent affection due from them to God.
13.
Chiefly Tennis. a score of zero; nothing.
14.
a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter L.
verb (used with object), loved, loving.
15.
to have love or affection for:
All her pupils love her.
16.
to have a profoundly tender, passionate affection for (another person).
17.
to have a strong liking for; take great pleasure in:
to love music.
18.
to need or require; benefit greatly from:
Plants love sunlight.
19.
to embrace and kiss (someone), as a lover.
20.
to have sexual intercourse with.
verb (used without object), loved, loving.
21.
to have love or affection for another person; be in love.
Verb phrases
22.
love up, to hug and cuddle:
She loves him up every chance she gets.
Idioms
23.
for love,
  1. out of affection or liking; for pleasure.
  2. without compensation; gratuitously:
    He took care of the poor for love.
24.
for the love of, in consideration of; for the sake of:
For the love of mercy, stop that noise.
25.
in love, infused with or feeling deep affection or passion:
a youth always in love.
26.
in love with, feeling deep affection or passion for (a person, idea, occupation, etc.); enamored of:
in love with the girl next door; in love with one's work.
27.
make love,
  1. to embrace and kiss as lovers.
  2. to engage in sexual activity.
28.
no love lost, dislike; animosity:
There was no love lost between the two brothers.
Origin
900
before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English lufu, cognate with Old Frisian luve, Old High German luba, Gothic lubō; (v.) Middle English lov(i)en, Old English lufian; cognate with Old Frisian luvia, Old High German lubōn to love, Latin lubēre (later libēre) to be pleasing; akin to lief
Related forms
outlove, verb (used with object), outloved, outloving.
overlove, verb, overloved, overloving.
Synonyms
1. tenderness, fondness, predilection, warmth, passion, adoration. 1, 2. Love, affection, devotion all mean a deep and enduring emotional regard, usually for another person. Love may apply to various kinds of regard: the charity of the Creator, reverent adoration toward God or toward a person, the relation of parent and child, the regard of friends for each other, romantic feelings for another person, etc. Affection is a fondness for others that is enduring and tender, but calm. Devotion is an intense love and steadfast, enduring loyalty to a person; it may also imply consecration to a cause. 2. liking, inclination, regard, friendliness. 15. like. 16. adore, adulate, worship.
Antonyms
1, 2. hatred, dislike. 15, 16. detest, hate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for love
  • The accident brings them closer and there is the first stirring of love.
  • In this case, the event is almost always two characters falling in love.
  • But it is hard to admit that one was without love in the past.
  • Bloom maintains that the difference is in the character of love.
  • Even love, when overexpressed, leads to intense possessiveness.
  • She tells him so, and despite his fervent vows of love, she knows his love will not last.
  • He professes a simple love of being greeted as he delivers the mail.
  • As matter was seen as a manifestation of power, it was also incompatible with love.
  • Helpers want, above all, to be loved and needed and fear being unworthy of love.
  • He was also still deeply in love with his first wife he would never get over her.
British Dictionary definitions for love

love

/lʌv/
verb
1.
(transitive) to have a great attachment to and affection for
2.
(transitive) to have passionate desire, longing, and feelings for
3.
(transitive) to like or desire (to do something) very much
4.
(transitive) to make love to
5.
(intransitive) to be in love
noun
6.
  1. an intense emotion of affection, warmth, fondness, and regard towards a person or thing
  2. (as modifier) love song, love story
7.
a deep feeling of sexual attraction and desire
8.
wholehearted liking for or pleasure in something
9.
(Christianity)
  1. God's benevolent attitude towards man
  2. man's attitude of reverent devotion towards God
10.
Also my love. a beloved person: used esp as an endearment
11.
(Brit, informal) a term of address, esp but not necessarily for a person regarded as likable
12.
(in tennis, squash, etc) a score of zero
13.
fall in love, to become in love
14.
for love, without payment
15.
(used with a negative) for love or money, in any circumstances I wouldn't eat a snail for love or money
16.
for the love of, for the sake of
17.
in love, in a state of strong emotional attachment and usually sexual attraction
18.
make love
  1. to have sexual intercourse (with)
  2. (archaic) to engage in courtship (with)
related
adjective amatory
Word Origin
Old English lufu; related to Old High German luba; compare also Latin libēre (originally lubēre) to please
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for love
love
O.E. lufu "love, affection, friendliness," from P.Gmc. *lubo (cf. O.Fris. liaf, Ger. lieb, Goth. liufs "dear, beloved;" not found elsewhere as a noun, except O.H.G. luba, Ger. Liebe), from PIE *leubh- "to care, desire, love" (cf. L. lubet, later libet "pleases;" Skt. lubhyati "desires;" O.C.S. l'ubu "dear, beloved;" Lith. liaupse "song of praise"). Meaning "a beloved person" is from early 13c. The sense "no score" (in tennis, etc.) is 1742, from the notion of "playing for love," i.e. "for nothing" (1670s). Love-letter is attested from mid-13c.; love-song from early 14c. To be in love with (someone) is from c.1500. Love life "one's collective amorous activities" is from 1919, originally a term in psychological jargon. Love affair is from 1590s. Phrase for love or money "for anything" is attested from 1580s. To fall in love is attested from early 15c. The phrase no love lost (between two people) is ambiguous and was used 17c. in ref. to two who love each other well (c.1640) as well as two who have no love for each other (1620s).
love
O.E. lufian, from P.Gmc. *lubojanan, from root of love (n.). Love-hate (adj.) "ambivalent" is from 1937, originally a term in psychological jargon.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for love
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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love in Technology

humour
What some users feel for computers.
"There is no truth in the rumour that I love computers, it's just what I tell them to get them to bed."
-- Terry Pratchett
[What did you expect in a computing dictionary?]
(2007-05-11)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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love in the Bible

This word seems to require explanation only in the case of its use by our Lord in his interview with "Simon, the son of Jonas," after his resurrection (John 21:16, 17). When our Lord says, "Lovest thou me?" he uses the Greek word _agapas_; and when Simon answers, he uses the Greek word _philo_, i.e., "I love." This is the usage in the first and second questions put by our Lord; but in the third our Lord uses Simon's word. The distinction between these two Greek words is thus fitly described by Trench:, "_Agapan_ has more of judgment and deliberate choice; _philein_ has more of attachment and peculiar personal affection. Thus the 'Lovest thou' (Gr. agapas) on the lips of the Lord seems to Peter at this moment too cold a word, as though his Lord were keeping him at a distance, or at least not inviting him to draw near, as in the passionate yearning of his heart he desired now to do. Therefore he puts by the word and substitutes his own stronger 'I love' (Gr. philo) in its room. A second time he does the same. And now he has conquered; for when the Lord demands a third time whether he loves him, he does it in the word which alone will satisfy Peter ('Lovest thou,' Gr. phileis), which alone claims from him that personal attachment and affection with which indeed he knows that his heart is full." In 1 Cor. 13 the apostle sets forth the excellency of love, as the word "charity" there is rendered in the Revised Version.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with love
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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7
9
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