low comedy

noun
comedy that depends on physical action, broadly humorous or farcical situations, and often bawdy or vulgar jokes.
Compare high comedy.


Origin:
1600–10

low comedian, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
low comedy
 
n
comedy characterized by slapstick and physical action
 
low comedian
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

low comedy

dramatic or literary entertainment with no underlying purpose except to provoke laughter by boasting, boisterous jokes, drunkenness, scolding, fighting, buffoonery, and other riotous activity. Used either alone or added as comic relief to more serious forms, low comedy has origins in the comic improvisations of actors in ancient Greek and Roman comedy. Low comedy can also be found in medieval religious drama, in the works of William Shakespeare, in farce and vaudeville, in the antics of motion-picture comedians, and in television.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Irony you can find in any gallery these days, also low comedy, puerile cool and
  enigma.
Irony you can find in any gallery these days, as well as low comedy, puerile
  cool and enigma.
The prophet himself mixed strong language with low comedy in his sermons.
For low comedy try a troupe of politicians in full cry against the evils of
  pork.
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