follow Dictionary.com

Denotation vs. Connotation

lucid

[loo-sid] /ˈlu sɪd/
adjective
1.
easily understood; completely intelligible or comprehensible:
a lucid explanation.
2.
characterized by clear perception or understanding; rational or sane:
a lucid moment in his madness.
3.
shining or bright.
4.
clear; pellucid; transparent.
Origin of lucid
1575-1585
1575-85; < Latin lūcidus, equivalent to lūc-, stem of lūx light1 + -idus -id4
Related forms
lucidity, lucidness, noun
lucidly, adverb
nonlucid, adjective
nonlucidly, adverb
nonlucidness, noun
unlucid, adjective
unlucidly, adverb
unlucidness, noun
Synonyms
1. plain, understandable, evident, obvious. 2. sound, reasonable. 3. radiant, luminous. 4. limpid.
Antonyms
1, 4. obscure. 2. irrational. 3. dim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for lucid
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Can he be ever strong enough, can his brain ever be lucid enough for the immensity of the task before him?

    The Intellectual Life =Philip Gilbert Hamerton
  • Many of his decisions were models of deep research and lucid statement.

  • She seems a person in her lucid intervals, of much shrewdness, and her understanding is above the common level.

    Ten Thousand Wonderful Things Edmund Fillingham King
  • Thereupon he gave a brief, lucid account of what had occurred in the night.

    Heather and Snow George MacDonald
  • Nevertheless Mr. Monk made his speech, and put all his arguments into lucid order.

    The Prime Minister Anthony Trollope
British Dictionary definitions for lucid

lucid

/ˈluːsɪd/
adjective
1.
readily understood; clear
2.
shining or glowing
3.
(psychiatry) of or relating to a period of normality between periods of insane or irresponsible behaviour
Derived Forms
lucidity, lucidness, noun
lucidly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin lūcidus full of light, from lūx light
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for lucid
adj.

1590s, "bright, shining," from Latin lucidus "light, bright, clear," figuratively "perspicuous, lucid, clear," from lucere "to shine," from lux (genitive lucis) "light," from PIE root *leuk- "to shine, be bright" (see light (n.)). Sense of "easy to understand" first recorded 1786. Lucid interval "period of calm or temporary sanity" (1580s) is from Medieval Latin lucida intervalla (plural), which was common in medieval English legal documents (cf. non est compos mentis, sed gaudet lucidis intervallis). Related: Lucidly; lucidness (1640s).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
lucid in Technology

1. Early query language, ca. 1965, System Development Corp, Santa Monica, CA. [Sammet 1969, p.701].
2. A family of dataflow languages descended from ISWIM, lazy but first-order.
Ashcroft & Wadge , 1981.
They use a dynamic demand driven model. Statements are regarded as equations defining a network of processors and communication lines, through which the data flows. Every data object is thought of as an infinite stream of simple values, every function as a filter. Lucid has no data constructors such as arrays or records. Iteration is simulated with 'is current' and 'fby' (concatenation of sequences). Higher-order functions are implemented using pure dataflow and no closures or heaps.
["Lucid: The Dataflow Language" by Bill Wadge wwadge@csr.UVic.CA and Ed Ashcroft, c. 1985]. ["Lucid, the Dataflow Programming Language", W. Wadge, Academic Press 1985].
(1995-02-16)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for lucid

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for lucid

8
11
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for lucid