lucre

[loo-ker]
noun
monetary reward or gain; money.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin lucrum profit; akin to Old English lēan reward, German Lohn, Gothic, Old Norse laun

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Collins
World English Dictionary
lucre (ˈluːkə)
 
n
facetious usually money or wealth (esp in the phrase filthy lucre)
 
[C14: from Latin lūcrum gain; related to Old English lēan reward, German Lohn wages]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lucre
late 14c., from L. lucrum "gain, profit," from PIE base *lu-/*leu- (cf. Gk. apo-lanein "to enjoy," Goth. launs, Ger. lohn "wages, reward," and possibly Skt. lotam, lotram "booty"). Filthy lucre (Tit. i:11) is Tyndale's rendering of Gk. aischron kerdos.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Lucre definition


from the Lat. lucrum, "gain." 1 Tim. 3:3, "not given to filthy lucre." Some MSS. have not the word so rendered, and the expression has been omitted in the Revised Version.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
The twist to this story is that, in a town ruled by lucre, this one wasn't about the money.
It could also impede the tech giants' direct path to online advertising lucre.
On the other hand, purists wail: another tradition lost to filthy lucre.
Lucre lies firstly in the proper timing of the prediction--not in its rightness.
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