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lunge1

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
2.
any sudden forward movement; plunge.
verb (used without object), lunged, lunging.
3.
to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.
verb (used with object), lunged, lunging.
4.
to thrust (something) forward; cause to move with a lunge:
lunging his finger accusingly.
Origin
1725-1735
1725-35; earlier longe for French allonge (noun; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate
Synonyms
2. rush, charge, lurch.

lunge2

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun, verb, lunged, lunging.
1.
Origin
variant of longe < French; see longe, lune2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for lunges
  • In midair the shark lunges at a seal and flips back into the water with a mighty splash.
  • Then he raises his head and lunges, thrusting his right hand above him and catching a rock hold with his fingertips.
  • She kept him laughing as they headed back home afterward by doing an array of squats and funny lunges.
  • The routine takes you through planks, lunges, lateral squats and stretches.
  • He lunges for a towel and staggers into the hallway as the ship's windmill-sized propeller spins out of the water.
  • It lunges for my eyes, hurling its blades at the grills in my armored mask.
  • With the taste of blood in its mouth, the shark lunges forward again.
  • It perches over a small pool, then lunges with both paws and comes up with a plump three-foot chum salmon.
  • He barks and growls, sometimes even lunges at people.
  • Once at the surface, the whale lunges upward and gulps down as many fish as it can with their huge mouths.
British Dictionary definitions for lunges

lunge1

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward motion
2.
(fencing) a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards
verb
3.
to move or cause to move with a lunge
4.
(intransitive) (fencing) to make a lunge
Derived Forms
lunger, noun
Word Origin
C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate

lunge2

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a rope used in training or exercising a horse
verb
2.
(transitive) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge
Word Origin
C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longuslong1; related to lunge1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lunges
lunge
1735, "a thrust with a sword," originally a fencing term, shortened from allonge, from Fr. allonger "to extend, thrust," from O.Fr. alongier "to lengthen, make long," from à "to" + O.Fr. long, from L. longus "long" (see long (adj.)). The verb is attested from 1809; the sense of "to make a sudden forward rush" is from 1821.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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