lunge

1 [luhnj]
noun
1.
a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
2.
any sudden forward movement; plunge.
verb (used without object), lunged, lunging.
3.
to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.
verb (used with object), lunged, lunging.
4.
to thrust (something) forward; cause to move with a lunge: lunging his finger accusingly.

Origin:
1725–35; earlier longe for French allonge (noun; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate


2. rush, charge, lurch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

lunge

2 [luhnj]
noun, verb, lunged, lunging.

Origin:
variant of longe < French; see longe, lune2

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
lunge1 (lʌndʒ)
 
n
1.  a sudden forward motion
2.  fencing a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards
 
vb
3.  to move or cause to move with a lunge
4.  (intr) fencing to make a lunge
 
[C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate]
 
'lunger1
 
n

lunge2 (lʌndʒ)
 
n
1.  a rope used in training or exercising a horse
 
vb
2.  (tr) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge
 
[C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longuslong1; related to lunge1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lunge
1735, "a thrust with a sword," originally a fencing term, shortened from allonge, from Fr. allonger "to extend, thrust," from O.Fr. alongier "to lengthen, make long," from à "to" + O.Fr. long, from L. longus "long" (see long (adj.)). The verb is attested from 1809; the
sense of "to make a sudden forward rush" is from 1821.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Lunging for that tasty morsel has swung you down into the end of the tube.
Lunging faster than their bulk should allow, the two testosterone-crazed males
  tear at each other with sharp canine teeth.
Lunging defensive stabs became down-the-line winners.
Therefore the dog would remain, growling constantly and occasionally lunging at
  me, throughout the interview.
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