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Eddy

[ed-ee] /ˈɛd i/
noun
1.
Mary (Morse) Baker (Mrs. Glover; Mrs. Patterson) 1821–1910, U.S. founder of the Christian Science Church.
2.
Also, Eddie. a male given name, form of Edgar or Edward.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for m m baker eddy

eddy

/ˈɛdɪ/
noun (pl) -dies
1.
a movement in a stream of air, water, or other fluid in which the current doubles back on itself causing a miniature whirlwind or whirlpool
2.
a deviation from or disturbance in the main trend of thought, life, etc, esp one that is relatively unimportant
verb -dies, -dying, -died
3.
to move or cause to move against the main current
Word Origin
C15: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse itha; related to Old English ed- again, back, Old High German it-

Eddy

/ˈɛdɪ/
noun
1.
Mary Baker. 1821–1910, US religious leader; founder of the Christian Science movement (1866)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for m m baker eddy

eddy

n.

mid-15c., Scottish ydy, possibly from Old Norse iða "whirlpool," from Proto-Germanic *ith- "a second time, again," which is related to the common Old English prefix ed- "again, backwards; repetition, turning" (forming such words as edðingung "reconciliation," edgift "restitution," edniwian "to renew, restore," edhwierfan "to retrace one's steps," edgeong "to become young again"). Cf. Old English edwielle "eddy, vortex, whirlpool." The prefix is cognate with Latin et, Old High German et-, Gothic "and, but, however." Related: Eddies.

v.

1810, from eddy (n.). Related: Eddied; eddying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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m m baker eddy in Science
eddy
  (ěd'ē)   
A current, as of water or air, moving in a direction that is different from that of the main current. Eddies generally involve circular motion; unstable patterns of eddies are often called turbulence. See also vortex.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for m m baker eddy

eddy

fluid current whose flow direction differs from that of the general flow; the motion of the whole fluid is the net result of the movements of the eddies that compose it. Eddies can transfer much more energy and dissolved matter within the fluid than can molecular diffusion in nonturbulent flow because eddies actually mix together large masses of fluid. Flow composed largely of eddies is called turbulent; eddies generally become more numerous as the fluid flow velocity increases. Energy is constantly transferred from large to small eddies until it is dissipated. (See fluid mechanics.)

Learn more about eddy with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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