m. elizabeth dodge

Dodge

[doj]
noun
Mary Elizabeth, 1831–1905, U.S. editor and author of children's books.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To m. elizabeth dodge
Collins
World English Dictionary
dodge (dɒdʒ)
 
vb
1.  to avoid or attempt to avoid (a blow, discovery, etc), as by moving suddenly
2.  to evade (questions, etc) by cleverness or trickery
3.  (intr) bell-ringing to make a bell change places with its neighbour when sounding in successive changes
4.  (tr) photog to lighten or darken (selected areas on a print) by manipulating the light from an enlarger
 
n
5.  a plan or expedient contrived to deceive
6.  a sudden evasive or hiding movement
7.  a clever contrivance
8.  bell-ringing the act of dodging
 
[C16: of unknown origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dodge
1560s, origin and sense evolution obscure, perhaps akin to Scottish dodd "to jog." Meaning "person's way of making a living" is from 1842. Common from early 18c. in figurative sense of "to swindle, to play shifting tricks." Related: Dodged; dodging.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Slang Dictionary

dodge definition

[dɑdʒ]
  1. n.
    a swindle; a scam; a deception. : What sort of dodge did you get flimflammed with?
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;