macerator

macerate

[mas-uh-reyt]
verb (used with object), macerated, macerating.
1.
to soften or separate into parts by steeping in a liquid.
2.
to soften or decompose (food) by the action of a solvent.
3.
to cause to grow thin.
verb (used without object), macerated, macerating.
4.
to undergo maceration.
5.
to become thin or emaciated; waste away.

Origin:
1540–50; < Latin mācerātus (past participle of mācerāre to make soft, weaken, steep); see -ate1

macerater, macerator, noun
macerative, adjective
unmacerated, adjective


5. shrink, shrivel, fade, wither.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
macerate (ˈmæsəˌreɪt)
 
vb
1.  to soften or separate or be softened or separated as a result of soaking
2.  to break up or cause to break up by soaking: macerated peaches
3.  to become or cause to become thin
 
[C16: from Latin mācerāre to soften]
 
'macerater
 
n
 
'macerator
 
n
 
'macerative
 
adj
 
macer'ation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

macerate
late 15c., from L. maceratus, pp. of macerare "soften," related to maceria "garden wall," originally "of kneaded clay," from PIE base *mag-/*meg- "to knead" (cf. Gk. magis "kneaded mass, cake," mageus "one who kneads, baker;" O.C.S. mazo "to anoint, smear;" Bret. meza "to knead;" M.Ir. maistir "to churn").
Related: Macerated; macerating.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

macerate mac·er·ate (mās'ə-rāt')
v. mac·er·at·ed, mac·er·at·ing, mac·er·ates

  1. To make soft by soaking or steeping in a liquid.

  2. To separate into constituents by soaking.

n.
A substance prepared or produced by macerating.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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