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magnetostriction

[mag-nee-toh-strik-shuh n] /mægˌni toʊˈstrɪk ʃən/
noun, Physics.
1.
a change in dimensions exhibited by ferromagnetic materials when subjected to a magnetic field.
Origin
1895-1900
1895-1900; magneto- + (con)striction
Related forms
magnetostrictive
[mag-nee-tuh-strik-tiv] /mægˌni təˈstrɪk tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for magnetostriction
  • Certain metal alloys of the lanthanide series showed tremendous potential for extremely high levels of magnetostriction.
  • Advance alloy theory and modeling to impact: saturation magnetization, anisotropy magnetostriction.
  • Proposed thermodynamic models including the effects of spin alignment, magnetostriction, and solute-strain have been developed.
British Dictionary definitions for magnetostriction

magnetostriction

/mæɡˌniːtəʊˈstrɪkʃən/
noun
1.
a change in dimensions of a ferromagnetic material that is subjected to a magnetic field
Derived Forms
magnetostrictive, adjective
Word Origin
C19: from magneto- + constriction
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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magnetostriction in Science
magnetostriction
  (māg-nē'tō-rĭ-strĭk'shən)   
The change in shape and density of a substance, especially a ferromagnetic substance, when exposed to a magnetic field. The change depends on the direction and strength of the magnetic field. Rapid, alternating magnetostriction causes the iron cores of household transformers, which are subject to a changing magnetic field, to hum or buzz.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for magnetostriction

change in the dimensions of a ferromagnetic material, such as iron or nickel, produced by a change in the direction and extent of its magnetization. An iron rod placed in a magnetic field directed along its length stretches slightly in a weak magnetic field and contracts slightly in a strong magnetic field. Mechanically stretching and compressing a magnetized iron rod inversely produces fluctuations in the magnetization of the rod. This effect is utilized in nickel magnetostriction transducers that transmit and receive high-frequency sound vibrations. A bent iron rod will straighten a bit in a longitudinally directed magnetic field, and a straight rod carrying an electric current will twist slightly in a magnetic field.

Learn more about magnetostriction with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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