magnums

magnum

[mag-nuhm]
noun
1.
a large wine bottle having a capacity of two ordinary bottles or 1.5 liters (1.6 quarts).
2.
a magnum cartridge or firearm.
adjective
3.
(of a cartridge) equipped with a larger charge than other cartridges of the same size.
4.
(of a firearm) using such a cartridge.
5.
Informal. unusually great in power or size: a magnum spotlight; a magnum dosage.

Origin:
1780–90; < Latin, neuter of magnus large; in reference to firearms, orig. used as a trademark by the Smith and Wesson Co.

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
magnum (ˈmæɡnəm)
 
n , pl -nums
a wine bottle holding the equivalent of two normal bottles (approximately 52 fluid ounces)
 
[C18: from Latin: a big thing, from magnus large]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

magnum
1788, "bottle containing two quarts of wine or spirits," from L. magnum, neut. of magnus "great" (see magnate). Registered 1935 by Smith & Wesson Inc., of Springfield, Mass., as the name of a powerful type of handgun.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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