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Magnus Annus

[mahg-noo s ahn-noo s] /ˈmɑg nʊs ˈɑn nʊs/
noun, Latin.
the Great Year: a cycle of years, usually a thousand, that begins with a Golden Age, steadily deteriorates, and ends with a universal catastrophe, either a fire or a flood. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for magnus
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  • magnus Derrick, who sat next to Annixter, was the first to receive his letter.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • They were constantly together and magnus kept no secrets from his favourite son.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • But the dining-room was empty, and his mother told him that magnus and the editor were in the "office."

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • His goal was to be in fact what magnus was only in name—governor.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • magnus, the king's son, overheard that and said: 'Now is he lying again, as is his wont.'

  • "There is something in that," observed magnus, as Harran drew up at the porch of the house.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • She held out her hand to magnus, which the placable Udaller instantly folded in his own ample palm.

    The Pirate Sir Walter Scott
  • We will have to get in with the machine some way and that's particularly why I want magnus with us.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • At that moment King magnus came on deck, and recognized Sweyn.

    The Story of Norway Hjalmar H. Boyesen
Word Origin and History for magnus


Scandinavian masc. proper name, popular with early kings, the first to use it was Magnus I, king of Norway and Denmark (d.1047), who evidently took it in emulation of Charlemagne (Latin Carolus Magnus) under the impression that magnus (Latin, literally "great;" see magnate) was a personal name.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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