makeshift

[meyk-shift]
noun
1.
a temporary expedient or substitute: We used boxes as a makeshift while the kitchen chairs were being painted.
adjective
2.
Also, makeshifty. serving as, or of the nature of, a makeshift.

Origin:
1555–65; noun, adj. use of verb phrase make shift


1. make-do, contrivance, jury-rig. 2. emergency, temporary, improvised, jury, ersatz.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
makeshift (ˈmeɪkˌʃɪft)
 
adj
1.  serving as a temporary or expedient means, esp during an emergency
 
n
2.  something serving in this capacity

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

makeshift
1565, "shifty person, rogue," from make (v.) + shift. Sense of "substitute" (adj.) is first recorded 1683.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Hundreds of thousands are living in makeshift camps.
Using a piece of vegetation as a makeshift pillow, a pair of elephant seals
  cuddle on the beach.
Drivers and cars get ready to rumble in makeshift service pits.
The only people in imminent danger are the guys standing around the makeshift
  launchpad.
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