mandamusses

mandamus

[man-dey-muhs] Law.
noun, plural mandamuses.
1.
a writ from a superior court to an inferior court or to an officer, corporation, etc., commanding that a specified thing be done.
verb (used with object)
2.
to intimidate or serve with such writ.

Origin:
< Latin mandāmus we command

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mandamus (mænˈdeɪməs)
 
n , pl -muses
law formerly a writ from, now an order of, a superior court commanding an inferior tribunal, public official, corporation, etc, to carry out a public duty
 
[C16: Latin, literally: we command, from mandāre to command]

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Word Origin & History

mandamus
1530s, "writ from a superior court to an inferior one, specifying that something be done," (late 14c. in Anglo-Fr.), from L., lit. "we order," first person plural pres. indicative of mandare "to order" (see mandate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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