mandolin

[man-dl-in, man-dl-in]
noun
a musical instrument with a pear-shaped wooden body and a fretted neck.

Origin:
1700–10; < Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, variant of mandora, alteration of pandora bandore

mandolinist, noun
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World English Dictionary
mandolin or mandoline (ˌmændəˈlɪn)
 
n
1.  a plucked stringed instrument related to the lute, having four pairs of strings tuned in ascending fifths stretched over a small light body with a fretted fingerboard. It is usually played with a plectrum, long notes being sustained by the tremolo
2.  a vegetable slicer consisting of a flat stainless-steel frame with adjustable cutting blades
 
[C18: via French from Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandora lute, ultimately from Greek pandoura musical instrument with three strings]
 
mandoline or mandoline
 
n
 
[C18: via French from Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandora lute, ultimately from Greek pandoura musical instrument with three strings]
 
mando'linist or mandoline
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mandolin
1707, from Fr. mandoline, from It. mandolino, dim. of mandola, a larger kind of mandolin, altered from L.L. pandura "three-stringed lute," from Gk. pandoura.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The day-long outdoor festival features mountain music performed by fiddlers, guitarists and mandolin and dulcimer players.
Each flutter from the mandolin and every sliding note from the pedal steel seemingly pull the listener down a country road.
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