Manifoldly

manifold

[man-uh-fohld]
adjective
1.
of many kinds; numerous and varied: manifold duties.
2.
having numerous different parts, elements, features, forms, etc.: a manifold program for social reform.
3.
using, functioning with, or operating several similar or identical devices at the same time.
4.
(of paper business forms) made up of a number of sheets interleaved with carbon paper.
5.
being such or so designated for many reasons: a manifold enemy.
noun
6.
something having many different parts or features.
7.
a copy or facsimile, as of something written, such as is made by manifolding.
8.
any thin, inexpensive paper for making carbon copies on a typewriter.
9.
Machinery. a chamber having several outlets through which a liquid or gas is distributed or gathered.
10.
Philosophy. (in Kantian epistemology) the totality of discrete items of experience as presented to the mind; the constituents of a sensory experience.
11.
Mathematics. a topological space that is connected and locally Euclidean. Compare locally Euclidean space.
verb (used with object)
12.
to make copies of, as with carbon paper.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English; Old English manigf(e)ald (adj.). See many, -fold

manifoldly, adverb
manifoldness, noun


1. various, multitudinous. See many. 2. varied, divers, multifarious.


1. simple, single.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
manifold (ˈmænɪˌfəʊld)
 
adj
1.  of several different kinds; multiple: manifold reasons
2.  having many different forms, features, or elements: manifold breeds of dog
 
n
3.  something having many varied parts, forms, or features
4.  a copy of a page, book, etc
5.  a chamber or pipe with a number of inlets or outlets used to collect or distribute a fluid. In an internal-combustion engine the inlet manifold carries the vaporized fuel from the carburettor to the inlet ports and the exhaust manifold carries the exhaust gases away
6.  maths
 a.  a collection of objects or a set
 b.  a topological space having specific properties
7.  (in the philosophy of Kant) the totality of the separate elements of sensation which are then organized by the active mind and conceptualized as a perception of an external object
 
vb
8.  (tr) to duplicate (a page, book, etc)
9.  to make manifold; multiply
 
[Old English manigfeald. See many, -fold]
 
'manifolder
 
n
 
'manifoldly
 
adv
 
'manifoldness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

manifold
O.E. monigfald (Anglian), manigfeald (W.Saxon), "varied in appearance," from manig "many" + -feald "fold." A common Gmc. compound (cf. O.Fris. manichfald, M.Du. menichvout, Swed. mångfalt, Goth. managfalþs), perhaps a loan-translation of L. multiplex (see
multiply). Retains the original pronunciation of many. The noun in the mechanical sense of "pipe or chamber with several outlets" is from 1884; originally as manifold pipe (1857), in ref. to a type of musical instrument mentioned in the O.T.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
manifold   (mān'ə-fōld')  Pronunciation Key 
A topological space or surface.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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