marbler

marble

[mahr-buhl]
noun
1.
metamorphosed limestone, consisting chiefly of recrystallized calcite or dolomite, capable of taking a high polish, occurring in a wide range of colors and variegations and used in sculpture and architecture.
2.
any variety of this stone: Carrara marble.
3.
an object made of or carved from this stone, especially a sculpture: Renaissance marbles.
4.
a piece of this stone: the fallen marbles of Roman ruins.
5.
(not in technical use) any of various breccias or other stones that take a high polish and show a variegated pattern.
6.
a marbled appearance or pattern; marbling: The woodwork had a greenish marble.
7.
anything resembling marble in hardness, coldness, smoothness, etc.: a brow of marble.
8.
something lacking in warmth or feeling.
9.
a little ball made of stone, baked clay, glass, porcelain, agate, or steel, especially for use in games.
10.
marbles, (used with a singular verb) a game for children in which a marble is propelled by the thumb to hit another marble so as to drive it out of a circle drawn or scratched on the ground.
11.
marbles, Slang. normal rational faculties; sanity; wits; common sense: to have all one's marbles; to lose one's marbles.
adjective
12.
consisting or made of marble.
13.
like marble, as in hardness, coldness, smoothness, etc.
14.
lacking in warmth, compassion, or sympathy: marble heart.
15.
of variegated or mottled color.
verb (used with object), marbled, marbling.
16.
to color or stain like variegated marble.
17.
to apply a decorative pattern to (paper, the edges of a book, etc.) by transferring oil pigments floating on water.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English marbel, dissimilated variant of Old English marmel (in marmelstān marble stone) < Latin marmor < Greek mármaros, akin to marmaírein to sparkle

marbler, noun
unmarbled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
marble (ˈmɑːbəl)
 
n
1.  a.  a hard crystalline metamorphic rock resulting from the recrystallization of a limestone: takes a high polish and is used for building and sculpture
 b.  (as modifier): a marble bust Related: marmoreal
2.  a block or work of art of marble
3.  a small round glass or stone ball used in playing marbles
4.  informal (Austral), (NZ) make one's marble good to succeed or do the right thing
5.  informal (Austral) pass in one's marble to die
 
vb
6.  (tr) to mottle with variegated streaks in imitation of marble
 
adj
7.  cold, hard, or unresponsive
8.  white like some kinds of marble
 
Related: marmoreal
 
[C12: via Old French from Latin marmor, from Greek marmaros, related to Greek marmairein to gleam]
 
'marbled
 
adj
 
'marbler
 
n
 
'marbly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

marble
c.1200, by dissimilation from O.Fr. marbre, from L. marmor, from or cognate with Gk. marmaros "marble, gleaming stone," of unknown origin, perhaps originally an adj. meaning "sparkling," which would connect it with marmairein "to shine." The L. word was taken directly into O.E. as marma. Meaning "little
balls of marble used in a children's game" is attested from 1690s. Marble cake is attested from 1871.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
marble   (mär'bəl)  Pronunciation Key 
A metamorphic rock consisting primarily of calcite and dolomite. Marble is formed by the metamorphism of limestone. Although it is usually white to gray in color, it often has irregularly colored marks due to the presence of impurities such as silica and clay. Marble is used especially in sculpture and as a building material.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Marble definition


as a mineral, consists of carbonate of lime, its texture varying from the highly crystalline to the compact. In Esther 1:6 there are four Hebrew words which are rendered marble:, (1.) Shesh, "pillars of marble." But this word probably designates dark-blue limestone rather than marble. (2.) Dar, some regard as Parian marble. It is here rendered "white marble." But nothing is certainly known of it. (3.) Bahat, "red marble," probably the verd-antique or half-porphyry of Egypt. (4.) Sohareth, "black marble," probably some spotted variety of marble. "The marble pillars and tesserae of various colours of the palace at Susa came doubtless from Persia itself, where marble of various colours is found, especially in the province of Hamadan Susiana." The marble of Solomon's architectural works may have been limestone from near Jerusalem, or from Lebanon, or possibly white marble from Arabia. Herod employed Parian marble in the temple, and marble columns still exist in great abundance at Jerusalem.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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