marking

[mahr-king]
noun
1.
a mark, or a number or pattern of marks: birds with colorful markings.
2.
the act of a person or thing that marks: the marking of papers.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English; see mark1, -ing1

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World English Dictionary
marking (ˈmɑːkɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a mark or series of marks
2.  the arrangement of colours on an animal, plant, etc
3.  assessment and correction of school children's or students' written work by teaching staff

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mark
"trace, impression," O.E. mearc (W.Saxon), merc (Mercian) "boundary, sign, limit, mark," from P.Gmc. *marko (cf. O.N. merki "boundary, sign," mörk "forest," which often marked a frontier; O.Fris. merke, Goth. marka "boundary, frontier," Du. merk "mark, brand," Ger. Mark "boundary, boundary land"),
from PIE *mereg- "edge, boundary" (cf. L. margo "margin," O.Ir. mruig "borderland"). The primary sense is probably "boundary," which had evolved by O.E. through "sign of a boundary," "sign in general," "impression or trace forming a sign." Meaning "any visible trace or impression" first recorded c.1200. Sense of "line drawn to indicate starting point of a race" (e.g. on your marks ...) first attested 1887. The M.E. sense of "target" (c.1200) is the notion in marksman and slang sense "victim of a swindle" (1883). The notion of "sign, token" is behind the meaning "numerical award given by a teacher" (1829). The verb is O.E. mearcian (W.Saxon), merciga (Anglian) "to trace out boundaries," from P.Gmc. *markojanan. Both noun and verb influenced by Scandinavian cognates. Mark time (1833) is from military drill.

mark
"unit of money or weight," late O.E. marc, a unit of weight (chiefly for gold or silver) equal to about eight ounces, probably from O.N. mörk "unit of weight," cognate with Ger. Mark, ult. a derivative of mark (1), perhaps in sense of "imprinted weight or coin." Used from
18c. in ref. to various continental coinages, esp. the silver coin of Germany first issued 1875.

Mark
masc. proper name, variant of Marcus (q.v.). Among the top 10 names given to boy babies born in the U.S. between 1955 and 1970.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

mark (märk)
n.

  1. A spot or line on a surface, visible through difference in color or elevation from that of the surrounding area.

  2. A distinctive trait or property.

v. marked, mark·ing, marks
  1. To make a visible trace or impression on, as occurs with a spot or dent.

  2. To form, make, or depict by making a mark.

  3. To distinguish or characterize.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences for markings
In addition to the many colours, there are also many different markings.
His kites had specific markings directing his fleet to perform his order.
Includes interpretive markings by the editor not indicated as such.
For conformation showing, symmetrical markings are preferred.
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