marvel

[mahr-vuhl]
noun
1.
something that causes wonder, admiration, or astonishment; a wonderful thing; a wonder or prodigy: The new bridge is an engineering marvel.
2.
Archaic. the feeling of wonder; astonishment.
verb (used with object), marveled, marveling or (especially British) marvelled, marvelling.
3.
to wonder at (usually followed by a clause as object): I marvel that you were able to succeed against such odds.
4.
to wonder or be curious about (usually followed by a clause as object): A child marvels that the stars can be.
verb (used without object), marveled, marveling or (especially British) marvelled, marvelling.
5.
to be filled with wonder, admiration, or astonishment, as at something surprising or extraordinary: I marvel at your courage.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English mervel < Old French merveil(l)e < Late Latin mīrābilia marvels, noun use of neuter plural of Latin mīrābilis marvelous. See admirable

marvelment, noun
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World English Dictionary
marvel (ˈmɑːvəl)
 
vb (when intr, often foll by at or about; when tr, takes a clause as object) , (US) -vels, -velling, -velled, -vels, -veling, -veled
1.  to be filled with surprise or wonder
 
n
2.  something that causes wonder
3.  archaic astonishment
 
[C13: from Old French merveille, from Late Latin mīrābilia, from Latin mīrābilis, from mīrārī to wonder at]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

marvel
c.1300, "miracle," also "wonderful story or legend," from O.Fr. merveille "a wonder," from V.L. *miribilia, alt. from L. mirabilia "wonderful things," from neut. pl. of mirabilis "strange or wonderful," from mirari "to wonder at," from mirus "wonderful" (see smile). A neut.
pl. treated in V.L. as a fem. sing. The verb is attested from c.1300. Related: Marveled; marveling; marvels.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Anyone who regularly attends new-music concerts has surely marveled at the
  versatility required of the participants.
She marveled in this little nation's fight for survival.
Physicians have long marveled at the body's ability to heal itself.
Those that had the privilege of working with him marveled at his vast
  knowledge, keen insight, and detailed approach.
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