masonry

[mey-suhn-ree]
noun, plural masonries.
1.
the craft or occupation of a mason.
2.
work constructed by a mason, especially stonework: the crumbling masonry of ancient walls.
3.
(initial capital letter) Freemasonry.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English masonerie < Middle French maçonnerie. See mason, -ery

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World English Dictionary
masonry (ˈmeɪsənrɪ)
 
n , pl -ries
1.  the craft of a mason
2.  work that is built by a mason; stonework or brickwork
3.  (often capital) short for Freemasonry

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

masonry
"stonework," mid-14c., from Fr. maçonnerie, from maçon (see mason).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It has the same simple geometry, regular rhythms of windows, and strong masonry
  walls as its neighbors.
Thick masonry walls also helped by having a thermal time constant of roughly
  half a day.
The construction technique using mortar is called masonry.
Ancient masonry hides behind thickets of scaffolding, planks and steel poles.
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