maté

[mah-tey, mat-ey, mah-tey]
noun
1.
a tealike South American beverage made from the dried leaves of an evergreen tree.
2.
a South American tree, Ilex paraguariensis, that is the source of this beverage.
3.
the dried leaves of this tree.
Also, mate.


Origin:
1710–20; < American Spanish mate, orig. the vessel in which the herb is steeped < Quechua mati

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
mate1 (meɪt)
 
n
1.  the sexual partner of an animal
2.  a marriage partner
3.  a.  informal chiefly (Brit), (Austral), (NZ) a friend, usually of the same sex: often used between males in direct address
 b.  (in combination) an associate, colleague, fellow sharer, etc: a classmate; a flatmate
4.  one of a pair of matching items
5.  nautical
 a.  short for first mate
 b.  any officer below the master on a commercial ship
 c.  a warrant officer's assistant on a ship
6.  (in some trades) an assistant: a plumber's mate
7.  archaic a suitable associate
8.  slang (Austral) mate rates the reduced rate charged for work done for a friend
 
vb
9.  to pair (a male and female animal) or (of animals) to pair for reproduction
10.  to marry or join in marriage
11.  (tr) to join as a pair; match
 
[C14: from Middle Low German; related to Old English gemetta table-guest, from metemeat]
 
'mateless1
 
adj

mate2 (meɪt)
 
n, —vb
chess See checkmate

maté or mate (ˈmɑːteɪ, ˈmæteɪ, ˈmɑːteɪ, ˈmæteɪ)
 
n
1.  an evergreen tree, Ilex paraguariensis, cultivated in South America for its leaves, which contain caffeine: family Aquifoliaceae
2.  a stimulating milky beverage made from the dried leaves of this tree
 
[C18: from American Spanish (originally referring to the vessel in which the drink was brewed), from Quechua máti gourd]
 
mate or mate
 
n
 
[C18: from American Spanish (originally referring to the vessel in which the drink was brewed), from Quechua máti gourd]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mate
"companion, associate, fellow, comrade," late 14c., from M.L.G. mate, gemate "one eating at the same table, messmate," from P.Gmc. *ga-maton "having food (*matiz) together (*ga-)," which is etymologically identical with companion (q.v.). Meaning "one of a wedded pair"
is attested from 1540s. Used as a form of address by sailors, laborers, etc., since at least mid-15c. Meaning "officer on a merchant vessel is from late 15c. The verb, of animals, "to pair for the purpose of breeding" is first recorded c.1600. The verb in chess (early 14c.) is short for checkmate (q.v.) and is not related.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

mate 1 (māt)
n.

  1. A spouse.

  2. Either of a pair of animals or birds that associate in order to propagate.

  3. Either of a pair of animals brought together for breeding.

v. mat·ed, mat·ing, mates
  1. To become joined in marriage.

  2. To be paired for reproducing; breed.

  3. To copulate.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Mate insurance provides a safeguard against reasonable risks of losing a partner.
My untenured office mate several years ago had a situation in which she was
  overtly pressured by a coach.
For mammals that form leks, however, scientists thought that factors other than
  mate choice attracted females to the party.
But unlike the other slugs, they mate while suspended from a long thread of
  slime.
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