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matter-of-fact

[mat-er-uhv-fakt]
adjective
1.
adhering strictly to fact; not imaginative; prosaic; dry; commonplace: a matter-of-fact account of the political rally.
2.
direct or unemotional; straightforward; down-to-earth.

Origin:
1705–15

matter-of-factly, adverb
matter-of-factness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
matter of fact
 
n
1.  a fact that is undeniably true
2.  law Compare matter of law a statement of facts the truth of which the court must determine on the basis of the evidence before it
3.  philosophy a proposition that is amenable to empirical testing, as contrasted with the truths of logic or mathematics
4.  as a matter of fact actually; in fact
 
adj
5.  unimaginative or emotionless: he gave a matter-of-fact account of the murder

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

matter-of-fact
also matter of fact, 1570s, originally a legal term (translating L. res facti), "that portion of an enquiry concerned with the truth or falsehood of alleged facts," opposed to matter of law. Meaning "prosaic, unimaginative" is from 1787.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As a matter of fact, you usually need a jacket at night and be ready for rain
  or downpours.
He said that this store at no time sells kosher meat and as a matter of fact
  specializes in pork cuts only.
It's a matter of fact for the majority of the world.
As a matter of fact the article has one point wrong.
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