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meek

[meek] /mik/
adjective, meeker, meekest.
1.
humbly patient or docile, as under provocation from others.
2.
overly submissive or compliant; spiritless; tame.
3.
Obsolete. gentle; kind.
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; Middle English meke, meoc < Old Norse mjūkr soft, mild, meek
Related forms
meekly, adverb
meekness, noun
overmeek, adjective
overmeekly, adverb
overmeekness, noun
Synonyms
1. forbearing; yielding; unassuming; pacific, calm, soft. See gentle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for meekness
  • The native took it with meekness not showing in his face or manner any resentment.
  • Her wonderful humility, meekness, and patience are celebrated in the lives of the fathers of the desert.
  • He was admirable in all virtues, particularly in a heavenly meekness and humility.
  • Nothing was more remarkable than his meekness on all occasions.
  • When any private persons thwarted or opposed his pious designs, he triumphed over their obstinacy by meekness and patience.
  • Some glances of real beauty may be seen in their faces who dwell in true meekness.
  • Marvin's meekness makes him such an inviting target for bullying that even normally friendly dogs turn vicious in his presence.
  • Tier meekness and courtesy, and effort to please, had won.
British Dictionary definitions for meekness

meek

/miːk/
adjective
1.
patient, long-suffering, or submissive in disposition or nature; humble
2.
spineless or spiritless; compliant
3.
an obsolete word for gentle
Derived Forms
meekly, adverb
meekness, noun
Word Origin
C12: related to Old Norse mjūkr amenable; compare Welsh mwytho to soften
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for meekness
n.

c.1200, meknesse; see meek (adj.) + -ness.

meek

adj.

c.1200, "gentle, quiet, unaggressive; benevolent, kind; courteous, humble, unassuming;" of a woman, "modest," from a Scandinavian source (cf. Old Norse mjukr "soft, pliant, gentle"), from Proto-Germanic *meukaz (cf. Gothic muka-modei "humility," Dutch muik "soft"), of uncertain origin, perhaps from PIE *meug- "slippery, slimy." In the Bible, it translates Latin mansuetus from Vulgate (see mansuetude). Sense of "submissive" is from mid-14c.

n.

"those who are meek," c.1200, from meek (adj.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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meekness in the Bible

a calm temper of mind, not easily provoked (James 3:13). Peculiar promises are made to the meek (Matt. 5:5; Isa. 66:2). The cultivation of this spirit is enjoined (Col. 3:12; 1 Tim. 6:11; Zeph. 2:3), and is exemplified in Christ (Matt. 11:29), Abraham (Gen. 13; 16:5, 6) Moses (Num. 12:3), David (Zech. 12:8; 2 Sam. 16:10, 12), and Paul (1 Cor. 9:19).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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14
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